Toddler Cooking: Easy Apple Crumble Recipe

Easy messy apple crisp recipe ingredients for 4-6 servings:

  • Topping: Half a cup of all purpose flour + 1/4 of granulated sugar + 1/4 cup of brown sugar + 1/2 tsp of ground cinnamon + 1/8 tsp of salt + 6 tbsp of cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • Filling: 3-4 apples peeled, cored and cut into chunks + 3tbsp of granulated sugar
  • Preheat oven to 375 F or 190 C. Butter baking dish.
  • Mix topping with fingertips (Sixtine’s favorite!) until crumbly.
  • Lick + eat  + spill + drop + laugh + enjoy each other.
  • Toss apple chunks and sugar (you can add some lemon as well but we didn’t) in a bowl and transfer to baking dish.
  • Spread topping evenly over the apples.
  • Bake for 30 to 40 minutes.
  • Let it cool for about half hour. Chase after toddler.
  • Enjoy.

Recipe adapted from Joy of Baking.

It was our first (real) time cooking together and Sixtine and I both enjoyed it a lot. I loved observing her as she was pouring and mixing ingredients. She was very studious and seemed so happy with herself.  De beaux souvenirs…(*beautiful memories) Oh and she is quite the cook too. It was delicious!

*make sure to enter this week’s giveaway!

My Toddler Is A Fussy Eater

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Is there anything more discouraging than your children refusing to eat what you lovingly prepared for them? It is beyond frustrating and it’s been happening a lot lately. I sometimes feel super lazy to cook but I do because it is part of the job! And I am almost proud of serving her a nice home cooked meal (nothing fancy but still, I am not much of a chef!) until she says “na”. I say “Try it. It is yummy look…Hummmmm. Sissi do it!”. And she says “na” again. And I get so upset! She often ends up eating just dessert. And it drives me nuts! I was starting to worry and posted a message on Baby Led Weaning’s Facebook Page and was almost immediately reassured reading this:

“- Dont allow the situation to be stressful.

– It still doesn’t matter if your older baby or toddler doesn’t eat at every meal as long as they are still receiving their usual milk when they want it still doesn’t matter if your older baby or toddler doesn’t eat at every meal as long as they are still receiving their usual milk when they want i

– Keep offering a variety of foods.

– As your child gets older, they can help in the preparation of the meal. Children who are involved often eat more adventurously than those who aren’t.”

It also seems to be quite common at this stage. So I guess I will keep doing what I am doing and wait until she eventually outgrows it!

Baby Led Weaning…Baby what ?!

Up until a few days ago, I had no idea what Baby Led Weaning was. Luckily, couple other momma bloggers suggested it as a way of introducing solid food for my baby.

So what is Baby Led Weaning?

Based on a paper written by Gill Rapley, Baby Led Weaning just means letting your child feed themselves from the very start of weaning.

According to the most recent research most babies reach for food at around six months, which is also the time that mothers are being encouraged to wean by their Health Visitors, in accordance with the WHO guidelines.

The distinct advantage of weaning at around six months is that by then, our children are developmentally capable of feeding themselves proper food, in other words – no more mush!

You just hand them the food in a suitably-sized piece and if they like it they eat it and if they don’t they won’t. (But they do, really they do… check out the baby with the pork chop).

That’s the essence of Baby Led Weaning. No purees, no ice cube trays, no food processor, no potato masher, no baby rice, no weird fruit and veg combos… just you and your child, eating food that you enjoy with you and your family.

Read more here: http://www.babyledweaning.com/

You can also buy the book:  “Baby-led Weaning: Helping Your Baby to Love Good Food” by Gill Rapley” as well as the cook book or;

Register to the forum here: http://www.babyledweaning.com/forum/

There is also an interesting of tricks and tips that you can find here: http://www.babyledweaning.com/some-tips-to-get-you-started/

I don’t know if we’ll go for it or not but I am definitely interested. I would like to purchase the book and do some more research but BLW makes a lot of sense to me.

So thank you ladies !

Did you know about Baby Led Weaning? What do you think of it? Have you experienced it? Any tips for first-timers? Please share !

 

Introducing Solid Food

The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends breastfeeding baby (exclusively) until he reaches 6 months of age.

After 6 months, baby needs more nutrients and this is when most people start introducing solid food to their baby.

My daughter is turning 4 months on Friday so we are not there yet but I was talking to my mother this morning

and she suggested giving cereals to the baby – as I was telling her how frustrating her reflux was.

There seems to be a change of guidelines every year or so for baby care and I find it really hard to keep up.

I have been asking around and everybody seems to say the same things:

“It is best to start at 6 months but I started mine at x months of age for this particular reason (…)”.

She was prescribed Zantac, then Prevacid which don’t seem to make much difference and I was starting to think that thickening

her milk (with whatever would be good for her) would make a difference. But I guess I am going to have to wait a little longer.

Here is a list of signs that baby is ready for solid foods by BestStart.Org:

Your baby is ready to start eating solids when she:
-is six months old;
-holds her head up;
-sits up in a high chair;
-opens her mouth wide when you offer food on a spoon;
-turns her face away if she doesn’t want the food;
-closes her lips over the spoon; and
-keeps food in her mouth and swallows it instead of pushing it out.

Make sure your baby shows all of these signs of readiness before you start solid foods.
At first your baby may not accept new foods. If she shows you that she does not like the food by closing her mouth or turning her head away, stop feeding her that food. Try it again another day. Keep feeding time pleasant. If your baby feels pressured to eat, she may not want to try other new foods.

Each baby is different. Try not to compare your baby to other babies. Follow your baby’s signs of readiness for food. Talk to your health care provider to help you decide if your baby is ready.

Read more here: http://www.beststart.org/resources/nutrition/pdf/feeding_baby_rev2010.pdf

I would love to hear about your own experience in introducing solid food to your baby. When? How much? And where you live as there seem to be differences across countries/cultures.